The Marine Biologist is the world’s leading magazine
dedicated to the discipline of marine biology.

We aim to bring readers the latest in research, communication and education, with contributions from leading names in the field.
Articles from previous editions of the magazine are available to read.
Published twice a year in full colour, The Marine Biologist magazine is one of the benefits of membership of the Marine Biological Association. Find out more about joining the MBA.

Issue 8

Issue 7

Issue 6

Issue 5

Issue 4

Issue 3

Issue 2

Issue 1

The 9th of January marked the beginning of a whole new experience, the day I became the Communications Assistant at the Marine Biological Association.

March is women’s history month and we thought it was appropriate to dedicate an article to women in marine science. It is not a secret that science (and related subjects) has had gender inequality right from the outset. But we should celebrate the successes and appreciate the efforts of those who have campaigned for equality over the past century.

Phil Williamson responds to “Ocean acidification: yet another wobbly pillar of climate alarmism” by James Delingpole, published in The Spectator 30 April 2016

The Marine Biologist magazine features articles drawn from the scientific literature, including the JMBA.

Pooling resources for marine science

The European Marine Biological Resource Centre by Nicolas Pade and Colin Brownlee
Author:
Nicholas Pade and Colin Brownlee
Category:
Biodiversity
Model organism

European marine educators, unite!

Knowledge is an engine for sustainable growth in the interconnected global economy and improving knowledge about the seas and oceans is a key element to achieving that growth in the European Union.

Author:
Géraldine Fauville, Evy Copejans and Fiona Crouch
Category:
ocean literacy

Carbon Credits: the new face of coastal conservation?

Melissa Schiele looks at the mechanisms behind ‘blue carbon’ trading.
Author:
Melissa Schiele
Category:
Climate change & Ocean acidification
Habitat protection and loss

Microalgae systematics: can we still fit a square peg in a round hole when new evidence says it is a triangle?

The genomic era may seriously challenge our quest to pigeonhole biological entities into species, write El-Mahdi Bendif and colleagues.
Author:
El-Mahdi Bendif and colleagues.
Category:
Genetics and molecular research
Marine microbes
Taxonomy

Too hot to handle

Ocean heat waves, marine biodiversity and ecosystem structure.

Dan Smale looks at an ocean heat wave that may have long-term consequences for a regional ecosystem. 

Author:
Dan Smale
Category:
Climate change & Ocean acidification
Ecology
Habitat protection and loss

Biological invasions and climate warming

Maria Antonietta PancucciPapadopoulou and colleagues examine the tropicalization of the Mediterranean
Author:
Maria Antonietta PancucciPapadopoulou
Category:
Invasive non-native species
Climate change & Ocean acidification

Are marine phytoplankton in decline?

Phytoplankton produce half of the world’s oxygen, comprise the base of the marine food web, and play an important role in carbon cycling and climate regulation. Changes in phytoplankton communities impact climate processes and all trophic levels of marine ecosystems, from zooplankton to fish to whales.

Author:
Abigail McQuatters-Gollop
Category:
Marine microbes
Climate change & Ocean acidification

A look at current policy developments

The UK Department for Environment Food & Rural Affairs (Defra) ran a consultation from the 13th December 2012 to 31st March 2013 on proposals for the designation of Marine Conservation Zones. To quote Defra, the response was ‘exceptional’ with over 40,000 responses received (to get an idea of how exceptional this was, a consultation from March to June 2012 on proposals for Good Environmental Status under the Marine Strategy Framework Directive received a total of 77 responses).

Author:
Matt Frost
Category:
Marine policy
Marine Protected Area

From the crows nest

A leading researcher takes a look at the challenges and opportunities in marine biology. In issue 1, Professor Colin Brownlee writes
Author:
Professor Colin Brownlee is the Director of the Marine Biological Association
Category:
Biogeochemical cycling
Invasive non-native species
Pharmaceutical applications
Marine microbes
Climate change & Ocean acidification
Genetics and molecular research
technology

From equator to ice; environmental science in the south Atlantic

Drs Deborah Davidson and Paul Brickle describe a new research institute that oversees marine biodiversity and environmental management
Author:
Dr Deborah Davidson and Dr Paul Brickle
Category:
Fishing & aquaculture
Biodiversity
Marine Protected Area
Marine policy

Advertising

Advertising space is available in The Marine Biologist magazine.

Everyone is fascinated by the sea

The Marine Biologist is a unique publication appealing to professionals and academics in environmental sciences, students (the marine professionals of the future), and young people. We aspire to be the quality, mass-audience magazine for the ocean.

Why advertise in The Marine Biologist?

  • A unique publication
  • Advertising placed with us reaches professionals and academics in environmental sciences, and students (the marine professionals of the future).
  • Discounts for charities, and low rates with savings on longer-term contracts.

The deadline for inclusion of advertisements in the next edition of The Marine Biologist magazine is July 31, 2017.

For prices and further information please contact membership@mba.ac.uk

The following organizations have advertised with us:

Cambridge International Examinations

PRIMER-E

Planet Ocean Ltd

CoolLED



If you have ideas or opinions about the magazine we would be delighted to hear from you.

The MBA Publications team

Tel: 01752 426239

editor@mba.ac.uk

Submissions

We welcome relevant articles, opinion pieces and reviews. See the submissions guidelines for further information.

Submissions

We welcome submissions of articles about marine life. Articles should be original and your own work. As a general guide we will ask:

  • is it new (or does it give a new slant on an existing subject)?
  • is it relevant?
  • is it accurate?
  • is it well written?

Guidelines for contributors:

We want to engage the whole marine biological community and we welcome ideas for articles. We will consider reviews of scientific literature, opinion pieces, letters, reviews of books, DVDs etc., poems, art and fiction. Articles can be much less formal in tone than a scientific paper, but should be original, concise and informative. In general we ask authors to use straightforward and clear language, and to avoid jargon.

A main article for The Marine Biologist magazine would be 1,500 to 2,000 words in length, but shorter pieces are very welcome. We are also looking for opinion pieces and reviews.

Please include representative, colourful images or graphics to support the story. You will need to own the copyright of images you submit, or have written permission from the copyright owner to use them in the context of a magazine that will be widely distributed.

Unfortunately we are unable to offer payment for articles.

If you are interested in submitting an article for consideration, please contact the Editor.

Feedback

If you have ideas or opinions about the magazine we would be delighted to hear from you.

The MBA Publications team

Tel: 01752 426239

editor@mba.ac.uk