Dreaming of a digital ocean

The Earth, the Blue planet, is so called because its largest biotope is a vast and deep intertwined blue expanse of salted oceans and seas. This liquid is filled with trillions of living organisms that are mostly invisible to the naked eye. These life forms have allowed us to breathe and to conquer terrestrial habitats. They are our ancestors, the rocks we use to build our homes, the oils we use to fuel our society, the food we eat (or the food of our food), and they may also hold the key to a healthy future for our planet in these troubling times of climate change.

Author:
Eric Röttinger, Aldine R. Amiel, Noan Le Bescot, Luis Gutierrez-Heredia, Peter Flood and Emmanuel G. Reynaud
Category:
technology
Climate change & Ocean acidification
Biodiversity
Citizen science

Too hot in paradise!

Despite a traditional and sustainable approach to managing resources, a remote Pacific atoll finds itself on the front line of a warming world.

By Michael White.

Tongareva (09° South; 158° West) is the largest and remotest atoll in the Cook Islands. The population is small, living in two villages, with a mainly subsistence lifestyle gathering food and daily resources from nature. There is a peripheral need for money to pay power and phone-bills and order bulk cargo, such as rice, flour and coffee, from Hawai’i. Shipping, however, is rare.

Author:
Michael White
Category:
Climate change & Ocean acidification

Fish poo and the climate challenge

Angela Martin looks at the science behind the headlines
Author:
Angela Martin
Category:
Megafauna
Biogeochemical cycling
Climate change & Ocean acidification
Marine policy
Silvia Earle submersible record

Planet earth's blue heart

Sylvia Earle and Dan Lafolley provide insights into the problems our blue planet faces, and offer big ideas about what we can do to help.

Author:
Sylvia Earle and Dan Lafolley
Category:
Climate change & Ocean acidification
technology
intertidal zone

Forecasting and communicating climate change impacts on marine systems

The long term nature of climate change generates challenges in communicating the related research. Lack of trust and over generalisations are discussed in this article by Nova Mieszkowska and Brian Helmuth, along with solutions to ease the communication barrier between scientists and non-scientists.

Author:
Nova Mieszkowska and Brian Helmuth.
Category:
Climate change & Ocean acidification
Ecology
Habitat protection and loss

The US gets serious on global ocean health

Phil Williamson and Carol Turley report from the “Our Ocean” conference hosted by John Kerry at the U.S. Department of State in Washington, D.C. in June.
Author:
Phil Williamson and Carol Turley
Category:
Marine policy
Fishing & aquaculture
Pollution
Climate change & Ocean acidification
Marine Protected Area

Losers and winners in a high CO2 world

Juliet Brodie, Chris Williamson and Jason Hall-Spencer assess the future of northeast Atlantic seaweeds and seagrasses
Author:
Juliet Brodie, Chris Williamson and Jason Hall-Spencer
Category:
Climate change & Ocean acidification
Habitat protection and loss

Carbon Credits: the new face of coastal conservation?

Melissa Schiele looks at the mechanisms behind ‘blue carbon’ trading.
Author:
Melissa Schiele
Category:
Climate change & Ocean acidification
Habitat protection and loss

Too hot to handle

Ocean heat waves, marine biodiversity and ecosystem structure.

Dan Smale looks at an ocean heat wave that may have long-term consequences for a regional ecosystem. 

Author:
Dan Smale
Category:
Climate change & Ocean acidification
Ecology
Habitat protection and loss

Biological invasions and climate warming

Maria Antonietta PancucciPapadopoulou and colleagues examine the tropicalization of the Mediterranean
Author:
Maria Antonietta PancucciPapadopoulou
Category:
Invasive non-native species
Climate change & Ocean acidification