Dreaming of a digital ocean

The Earth, the Blue planet, is so called because its largest biotope is a vast and deep intertwined blue expanse of salted oceans and seas. This liquid is filled with trillions of living organisms that are mostly invisible to the naked eye. These life forms have allowed us to breathe and to conquer terrestrial habitats. They are our ancestors, the rocks we use to build our homes, the oils we use to fuel our society, the food we eat (or the food of our food), and they may also hold the key to a healthy future for our planet
in these troubling times of climate change.

Author:
Eric Röttinger, Aldine R. Amiel, Noan Le Bescot, Luis Gutierrez-Heredia, Peter Flood and Emmanuel G. Reynaud
Category:
technology
Climate change & Ocean acidification
Biodiversity
Citizen science

Not all algae who wander are lost

Erik Sotka and Stacy Krueger-Hadfield describe an unusually successful invasion—and a novel partnership.
Author:
Erik Sotka and Stacy Krueger-Hadfield
Category:
Invasive non-native species
Genetics and molecular research
Biodiversity

Mapping the treasures of the deep sea

Heriot-Watt University and the National Oceanography Centre join forces to map cold-water coral habitats. By Laurence De Clippele, Veerle Huvenne and Murray Roberts
Author:
Laurence De Clippele, Veerle Huvenne and Murray Roberts.
Category:
Habitat protection and loss
Biodiversity

Refugia in the ‘twilight zone’: discoveries from the Philippines

Author:
Sonia J. Rowley
Category:
Biodiversity
technology
Habitat protection and loss
Taxonomy

Pooling resources for marine science

The European Marine Biological Resource Centre by Nicolas Pade and Colin Brownlee
Author:
Nicholas Pade and Colin Brownlee
Category:
Biodiversity
Model organism

From equator to ice; environmental science in the south Atlantic

Drs Deborah Davidson and Paul Brickle describe a new research institute that oversees marine biodiversity and environmental management
Author:
Dr Deborah Davidson and Dr Paul Brickle
Category:
Fishing & aquaculture
Biodiversity
Marine Protected Area
Marine policy
Red Sea

Seeking the fountain of youth in the twilight zone

Recent technological advances have led to a dizzying diversity of research possibilities, one of which is anti-ageing exploration. This article describes the process of extraction, discovery and testing of anti-ageing compounds from invertebrates found in the mesophotic zone.

Author:
Jamal Ouazzani, Yehuda Benayahu and Ioannis Trougakos.
Category:
Biodiversity
technology
Pharmaceutical applications