Marine Biological Association statement on the passing of our Patron, His Royal Highness, Prince Philip, The Duke of Edinburgh.

Posted on Apr 9, 2021

Marine Biological Association statement on the passing of our Patron, His Royal Highness, Prince Philip, The Duke of Edinburgh.

The Marine Biological Association (MBA) is sad to hear of the death of our Patron, His Royal Highness, Prince Philip, The Duke of Edinburgh. Prince Philip has been the Patron of the MBA since 1953. He has shown a keen interest in raising public awareness of the relationship of humanity with the environment and was awarded an Honorary Fellowship by the Association in 2014.

A number of MBA staff had the privilege of meeting His Royal Highness over the years and he showed himself both interested and passionate when it came to discussing marine environmental issues. In 2014, for example, he attended an event celebrating the granting of a Royal Charter to the MBA and spent a great deal of time speaking to those present including a lively discussion with a...

The Marine Biologist magazine: Arctic Special Issue is Open Access

Posted on Apr 6, 2021

The changing Arctic Ocean and new research in the UK and Russia

The Arctic Ocean is the fastest warming region on Earth. In the new Special Issue of The Marine Biologist magazine we focus on concerted international scientific efforts to better understand the changing Arctic Ocean. Access to The Marine Biologist magazine is usually an exclusive benefit of MBA membership, however, for a limited period we are releasing this Special Issue on Open Access.

From phytoplankton to polar bears and permafrost, the stories and images from UK and Russian contributors give an authentic flavour of this cold and remote ocean, and its global importance. Highlights include Changing Arctic Ocean projects with close links with researchers in Russia, an article on MOSAiC , the biggest Arctic expedition in history, and a conversation with Professor...

The Plymouth Blitz: Commemorating the 80th anniversary of the bombing of the MBA

Posted on Mar 20, 2021

The Plymouth Blitz: Commemorating the 80 th anniversary of the bombing of the MBA

The 20 th of March 2021 marks 80 years since the bombing of the Marine Biological Association (MBA) during the Plymouth Blitz in 1941. Today we’re sharing stories from the day from our Director, Willie Wilson, and staff member Rob Camp, whose great uncle was a warden in the city during the Blitz.

The MBA was partly destroyed by fire.

Stanley Wells Kemp FRS was Director of the MBA from 1936 to 1945. At the time, the Director and his family resided at the building. On the evening of the 20 th of March the alert was sounded, and it quickly became apparent that an attack was taking place as hundreds of incendiaries were dropped on the city. As Dr Kemp and the fire guards searched the building, a familiar whine was heard and a bomb struck right outside of the Director’s kitchen...

New walking trail takes you on a step back into the history of Plymouth's Powerful Women, meandering through time to discover the women who challenged expectations and made Plymouth the city it is today.

Posted on Mar 8, 2021

New walking trail takes you on a step back into the history of Plymouth's Powerful Women, meandering through time to discover the women who challenged expectations and made Plymouth the city it is today

Launching on International Women's Day on the 8th of March on the Plymouth Trails app, the new 1.2 mile route celebrates 100 years of Plymouth's Powerful Women, introducing some of the important and influential women who made a real difference to the City. As a maritime city, Plymouth has a long tradition of female activism and engagement as so many of its men were away at sea.

Starting at the Nancy Astor statue on the Hoe, the route visits locations where these women lived or worked, telling their stories through images, video, and text. Stop 2, "Breaking Scientific Boundaries", delves into the lives and achievements of some of our own change-making women...

Sharks under pressure: Deoxygenating deep-sea drives sharks to the surface

Posted on Jan 19, 2021

Sharks under pressure: Deoxygenating deep-sea drives sharks to the surface Climate-driven ocean deoxygenation renders the ocean’s most wide-ranging shark more vulnerable to fishing

Research carried out by scientists at the Marine Biological Association (MBA) and institutes in Portugal and Spain, is the first to test whether expanding oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) in the oceans push sharks closer to the surface, making them more susceptible to capture by fisheries.

Climate-driven changes in the ocean are leading to reduced amounts of dissolved oxygen in seawater, known as ocean deoxygenation. It causes permanent OMZs that exist across the oceans, typically at depths of around 200-800 metres, to expand both horizontally and vertically. Ocean deoxygenation is likely to have important effects on large, high-oxygen demand fish such as pelagic sharks.

Blue sharks are...

CPR data contribute to Scotland's latest Marine Assessment

Posted on Jan 8, 2021

Scotland’s latest Marine Assessment reveals significant changes are taking place at the heart of the marine food web, with potential for impacts on the wider pelagic environment.

For the first time, a team of researchers has published an assessment based on all available plankton time-series data from Scottish waters to investigate the current state of the plankton community, and therefore ocean health, and to identify if it has changed over time.

Researchers from Marine Scotland Science, Scottish Environment Protection Agency, the Scottish Association for Marine Science and the Marine Biological Association worked together to combine available plankton data in an attempt to understand conditions in the pelagic environment. Plankton form the very base of the marine foodweb, and are excellent indicators of marine health. This combined approach...

New research sheds light on early mechanisms driving diatom bloom formation

Posted on Jan 5, 2021

New research sheds light on early mechanisms driving diatom bloom formation Scientists describe a new role for calcium ion signalling in eukaryotes, for phosphate sensing, for the first time.

MBA researchers Katherine Helliwell, Glen Wheeler and Colin Brownlee in collaboration with scientists at Plymouth Marine Laboratory (PML) and the University of Warwick have shed light on how diatoms (a type of eukaryotic algae) sense the availability of phosphorus, a vital macronutrient which controls diatom growth and productivity in the oceans. The research, which has been published in the journal Current Biology [1], demonstrated a new role for calcium ion (Ca 2+ ) signalling in eukaryotes, for phosphate sensing, which has not previously been described.

Marine diatoms under the light microscope. ©Glen L. Wheeler

Diatoms are responsible for 20% of global primary...