Not all algae who wander are lost

Erik Sotka and Stacy Krueger-Hadfield describe an unusually successful invasion—and a novel partnership.
Author:
Erik Sotka and Stacy Krueger-Hadfield
Category:
Invasive non-native species
Genetics and molecular research
Biodiversity

A traditional fishery enters ‘a new era'

Native oysters Ostrea edulis are fished in the Fal estuary in Cornwall, south west England using only traditional sailing and rowing vessels. In December I accompanied Richard Clapham on board the Falmouth working boat HollyAnne to see this fishery first-hand.

Author:
Guy Baker
Category:
Fishing & aquaculture
Invasive non-native species
Marine policy

Biological invasions and climate warming

Maria Antonietta PancucciPapadopoulou and colleagues examine the tropicalization of the Mediterranean
Author:
Maria Antonietta PancucciPapadopoulou
Category:
Invasive non-native species
Climate change & Ocean acidification

From the crows nest

A leading researcher takes a look at the challenges and opportunities in marine biology. In issue 1, Professor Colin Brownlee writes
Author:
Professor Colin Brownlee is the Director of the Marine Biological Association
Category:
Biogeochemical cycling
Invasive non-native species
Pharmaceutical applications
Marine microbes
Climate change & Ocean acidification
Genetics and molecular research
technology

Power from the sea: stepping stones for non-native species?

Renewable energy is a growing industry whose viability is increasing as the unsustainability and environmental pressures of conventional energy generation become more apparent. In the UK a large proportion of the future renewable energy production is planned to be generated in the marine environment from offshore wind, wave and tidal stream energy farms. At present there are a number of offshore wind farms already operational and some experimental wave and tidal stream devices are being tested; currently over 90 marine energy farms are planned or already installed.

Author:
Chris Nall (Chris.Nall@uhi.ac.uk) is a PhD Student at the Environment Research Institute.
Category:
Invasive non-native species

Marinexus: Our Shared Sea

Marinexus was a major European Interreg-funded project which looked at mechanisms of ecosystem change in the Western English Channel. The Marinexus partnership included the Marine Biological Association, the Sir Alister Hardy Foundation for Ocean Science, and the Station Biologique de Roscoff. In addition to the advances in research, the project strengthened cross-Channel links paving the way for future research and outreach collaborations.
Author:
Marinexus
Category:
Invasive non-native species