The Marine Biologist is the world’s leading magazine
dedicated to the discipline of marine biology.

We aim to bring readers the latest in research, communication and education, with contributions from leading names in the field.
Articles from previous editions of the magazine are available to read.
Published twice a year in full colour, The Marine Biologist magazine is one of the benefits of membership of the Marine Biological Association. Find out more about joining the MBA.

Issue 9

The Marine Biologist Issue 9 - cover

Issue 8

Issue 7

Issue 6

Issue 5

Issue 4

Issue 3

Issue 2

Issue 1

Whether this finds you in an austral spring, a boreal autumn, or a tropical monsoon, we wish you a warm welcome to The Marine Biologist magazine. 

The 9th of January marked the beginning of a whole new experience, the day I became the Communications Assistant at the Marine Biological Association.

March is women’s history month and we thought it was appropriate to dedicate an article to women in marine science. It is not a secret that science (and related subjects) has had gender inequality right from the outset. But we should celebrate the successes and appreciate the efforts of those who have campaigned for equality over the past century.

Phil Williamson responds to “Ocean acidification: yet another wobbly pillar of climate alarmism” by James Delingpole, published in The Spectator 30 April 2016

Could studying marine biology at Hull be a gateway to your future?

Our series of articles on degree courses in marine biology aims to help you choose the right course in the right place. In this edition the spotlight turns to Hull in East Yorkshire, England. By Sue Hull.
Author:
Dr Sue Hull
Category:
Careers in marine biology
Exploring the shore at Porthleven after the spill

The 50th Anniversary of an environmental disaster

Eve Southward recounts the MBA's response to the Torrey Canyon oil spill.

Author:
Eve Southward
Category:
Pollution

Evolution of the pelagic ecosystem: a history written in tiny teeth

Author:
Elizabeth Sibert
Category:
Megafauna
Ecosystem
Evolution

The origin of nervous systems

Author:
Pawel Burkhardt
Category:
Evolution
Model organism

Fish poo and the climate challenge

Angela Martin looks at the science behind the headlines
Author:
Angela Martin
Category:
Megafauna
Biogeochemical cycling
Climate change & Ocean acidification
Marine policy
d smale

A career in marine biology

Marine biology is the study of all aspects of life in the sea and the environment on which it depends. The main aims are to improve our understanding of the marine world and to understand and predict changes in ecosystems affected by human and natural disturbances.

Author:
Paul Greer
Category:
Careers in marine biology
Atlantic Bluefin Tuna

Moving sushi

Following the dramatic appearance of a large bluefin tuna shoal off the coast of Cornwall,UK, this article summarises the history of bluefin fisheries and discusses possible reasons for this unusual occurrence.  

Author:
Tom Horton
Category:
Fishing & aquaculture
Megafauna
Silvia Earle submersible record

Planet earth's blue heart

Sylvia Earle and Dan Lafolley provide insights into the problems our blue planet faces, and offer big ideas about what we can do to help.

Author:
Sylvia Earle and Dan Lafolley
Category:
Climate change & Ocean acidification
technology
Paul Rose, Sharks

Going for it: Paul Rose talks about opportunities, communication and pristine seas

Paul Rose is an explorer and one of the world’s most experienced divers and polar experts. He is Expedition Leader for the National Geographic Pristine Seas Expeditions and has just finished his second term as Vice President of the Royal Geographical Society. The Marine Biologist caught up with him between expeditions.
Author:
Paul Rose
Category:
Interview
Pollution
Marine Protected Area
Marine policy
Fishing & aquaculture
Careers in marine biology
intertidal zone

Forecasting and communicating climate change impacts on marine systems

The long term nature of climate change generates challenges in communicating the related research. Lack of trust and over generalisations are discussed in this article by Nova Mieszkowska and Brian Helmuth, along with solutions to ease the communication barrier between scientists and non-scientists.

Author:
Nova Mieszkowska and Brian Helmuth.
Category:
Climate change & Ocean acidification
Ecology
Habitat protection and loss

Advertising

Advertising space is available in The Marine Biologist magazine.

Everyone is fascinated by the sea

The Marine Biologist is a unique publication appealing to professionals and academics in environmental sciences, students (the marine professionals of the future), and young people. We aspire to be the quality, mass-audience magazine for the ocean.

Why advertise in The Marine Biologist?

  • A unique publication
  • Advertising placed with us reaches professionals and academics in environmental sciences, and students (the marine professionals of the future).
  • Discounts for charities, and low rates with savings on longer-term contracts.

The deadline for inclusion of advertisements in the next edition of The Marine Biologist magazine is July 31, 2017.

For prices and further information please contact membership@mba.ac.uk

The following organizations have advertised with us:

Cambridge International Examinations

PRIMER-E

Planet Ocean Ltd

CoolLED



If you have ideas or opinions about the magazine we would be delighted to hear from you.

The MBA Publications team

Tel: 01752 426239

editor@mba.ac.uk

Submissions

We welcome relevant articles, opinion pieces and reviews. See the submissions tab for further information.

Submissions

We welcome submissions of articles about marine life. Articles should be original and your own work. As a general guide we will ask:

  • is it new (or does it give a new slant on an existing subject)?
  • is it relevant?
  • is it accurate?
  • is it well written?

Guidelines for contributors:

We want to engage the whole marine biological community and we welcome ideas for articles. We will consider reviews of scientific literature, opinion pieces, letters, reviews of books, DVDs etc., poems, art and fiction. Articles can be much less formal in tone than a scientific paper, but should be original, concise and informative. In general we ask authors to use straightforward and clear language, and to avoid jargon.

A main article for The Marine Biologist magazine would be 1,500 to 2,000 words in length, but shorter pieces are very welcome. We are also looking for opinion pieces and reviews.

Please include representative, colourful images or graphics to support the story. You will need to own the copyright of images you submit, or have written permission from the copyright owner to use them in the context of a magazine that will be widely distributed.

Unfortunately we are unable to offer payment for articles.

If you are interested in submitting an article for consideration, please contact the Editor.

Feedback

If you have ideas or opinions about the magazine we would be delighted to hear from you.

The MBA Publications team

Tel: 01752 426239

editor@mba.ac.uk