The Marine Biologist is the world’s leading magazine
dedicated to the discipline of marine biology.

We aim to bring readers the latest in research, communication and education, with contributions from leading names in the field.
Articles from previous editions of the magazine are available to read.
Published twice a year in full colour, The Marine Biologist magazine is one of the benefits of membership of the Marine Biological Association. Find out more about joining the MBA.

Issue 8

Issue 7

Issue 6

Issue 5

Issue 4

Issue 3

Issue 2

Issue 1

The 9th of January marked the beginning of a whole new experience, the day I became the Communications Assistant at the Marine Biological Association.

March is women’s history month and we thought it was appropriate to dedicate an article to women in marine science. It is not a secret that science (and related subjects) has had gender inequality right from the outset. But we should celebrate the successes and appreciate the efforts of those who have campaigned for equality over the past century.

Phil Williamson responds to “Ocean acidification: yet another wobbly pillar of climate alarmism” by James Delingpole, published in The Spectator 30 April 2016

The Marine Biologist magazine features articles drawn from the scientific literature, including the JMBA.

Portsmouth Students Sampling

Marine biology at the University of Portsmouth

With a maritime history dating back 500 years Portsmouth is described as ideal location to study Marine Biology. Human exploitation and damage of the local marine environment is a key theme within this degree with emphasis on how to restore and protect the varied ecosystems. The university boasts an impressive record of high impact research and exposes students to a multidisciplinary approach to the study of marine biology.

Author:
Gordon Watson
Category:
Careers in marine biology
killer whales 2

The killer whales of the North Atlantic

Our understanding of killer whale ecology and evolution has come a long way in the last 25 years, but, as Andrew Foote and colleagues explain, there are still many gaps in our knowledge.
Author:
Andrew Foote, Sanna Kuningas and Filipa I. P. Samarra
Category:
Megafauna
technology
Genetics and molecular research
Liverpool

One hundred and thirty five years of marine biology at the University of Liverpool

With a prominent maritime history and marine biology research pre-dating the 20th century, the University of Liverpool is proud to be the first UK institution to offer a degree in Marine Biology. Bryony Caswell explains the development of this course over the decades to reflect contemporary challenges. Following this is a student’s perspective which provides an in-situ experience of marine biology at the University of Liverpool.

Author:
Bryony Caswell
Category:
Careers in marine biology
Red sea fingers

England’s MPAs – towards a well-managed network

Representatives from Natural England and IFCA attempt to untangle the complexities of Marine Protected Areas (MPA) in the UK. Commitment, collaboration and clear regulations are needed to make a successful MPA, read on to discover who is involved and how MPA’s are managed.

Author:
Jen Ashworth and Leanne Stockdale
Category:
Marine Protected Area
Marine policy

Lagoon conservation in the Azores

The Azores are proud to hold 4 of the 981 sites on the World Heritage List which have outstanding cultural and natural heritage. The application of a 5th site is being put forward and its relevant criteria are listed here.

Author:
Brian Morton
Category:
Habitat protection and loss

Growing white shark populations in US waters – a sign of ecosystem recovery?

Evidence provided by an army of scientist about the environment health of California’s surrounding oceans from 1920 to 1990 lead to major federal and state legislation. Chris Lowe details the history of this process which resulted in improvements in water quality and fisheries management allowing the growth in white shark and other top predator populations.

Author:
Chris Lowe
Category:
Fishing & aquaculture
Megafauna
Habitat protection and loss
Picture of angelshark

Oceans of change

Callum Roberts provides a detailed account of the history of local fisheries and its general decline since the 1930’s. From historic devastating effects of overfishing and trawling to modern plastics and synthetic chemicals this article outlines problems and possible solutions to protecting the balance of conservation and the fishing industry.

Author:
Callum Roberts
Category:
history
Fishing & aquaculture
Marine policy
Megafauna

Marinexus: Our Shared Sea

Marinexus was a major European Interreg-funded project which looked at mechanisms of ecosystem change in the Western English Channel. The Marinexus partnership included the Marine Biological Association, the Sir Alister Hardy Foundation for Ocean Science, and the Station Biologique de Roscoff. In addition to the advances in research, the project strengthened cross-Channel links paving the way for future research and outreach collaborations.
Author:
Marinexus
Category:
Invasive non-native species
Guy Baker Profile

Editorial Issue 7

In 2014, humans ate more fish raised on farms than fish caught in the wild. This huge shift slipped past largely unnoticed but it has massive implications for ocean and human health. In this edition we are delighted to present as our leading article two contrasting views of the aquaculture debate led by high-profile researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Author:
Guy Baker

Editorial Issue 6

In April 2015, a postcard was returned to The Marine Biological Association that had been adrift in the North Sea for over 108 years. Last month we learned that the postcard is a new world record for a message in a bottle. You can find out more on page 4.

Author:
Guy Baker

Advertising

Advertising space is available in The Marine Biologist magazine.

Everyone is fascinated by the sea

The Marine Biologist is a unique publication appealing to professionals and academics in environmental sciences, students (the marine professionals of the future), and young people. We aspire to be the quality, mass-audience magazine for the ocean.

Why advertise in The Marine Biologist?

  • A unique publication
  • Advertising placed with us reaches professionals and academics in environmental sciences, and students (the marine professionals of the future).
  • Discounts for charities, and low rates with savings on longer-term contracts.

The deadline for inclusion of advertisements in the next edition of The Marine Biologist magazine is July 31, 2017.

For prices and further information please contact membership@mba.ac.uk

The following organizations have advertised with us:

Cambridge International Examinations

PRIMER-E

Planet Ocean Ltd

CoolLED



If you have ideas or opinions about the magazine we would be delighted to hear from you.

The MBA Publications team

Tel: 01752 426239

editor@mba.ac.uk

Submissions

We welcome relevant articles, opinion pieces and reviews. See the submissions tab for further information.

Submissions

We welcome submissions of articles about marine life. Articles should be original and your own work. As a general guide we will ask:

  • is it new (or does it give a new slant on an existing subject)?
  • is it relevant?
  • is it accurate?
  • is it well written?

Guidelines for contributors:

We want to engage the whole marine biological community and we welcome ideas for articles. We will consider reviews of scientific literature, opinion pieces, letters, reviews of books, DVDs etc., poems, art and fiction. Articles can be much less formal in tone than a scientific paper, but should be original, concise and informative. In general we ask authors to use straightforward and clear language, and to avoid jargon.

A main article for The Marine Biologist magazine would be 1,500 to 2,000 words in length, but shorter pieces are very welcome. We are also looking for opinion pieces and reviews.

Please include representative, colourful images or graphics to support the story. You will need to own the copyright of images you submit, or have written permission from the copyright owner to use them in the context of a magazine that will be widely distributed.

Unfortunately we are unable to offer payment for articles.

If you are interested in submitting an article for consideration, please contact the Editor.

Feedback

If you have ideas or opinions about the magazine we would be delighted to hear from you.

The MBA Publications team

Tel: 01752 426239

editor@mba.ac.uk