The Marine Biologist is the world’s leading magazine
dedicated to the discipline of marine biology.

We aim to bring readers the latest in research, communication and education, with contributions from leading names in the field.
Articles from previous editions of the magazine are available to read.
Published twice a year in full colour, The Marine Biologist magazine is one of the benefits of membership of the Marine Biological Association. Find out more about joining the MBA.

Issue 8

Issue 7

Issue 6

Issue 5

Issue 4

Issue 3

Issue 2

Issue 1

The 9th of January marked the beginning of a whole new experience, the day I became the Communications Assistant at the Marine Biological Association.

March is women’s history month and we thought it was appropriate to dedicate an article to women in marine science. It is not a secret that science (and related subjects) has had gender inequality right from the outset. But we should celebrate the successes and appreciate the efforts of those who have campaigned for equality over the past century.

Phil Williamson responds to “Ocean acidification: yet another wobbly pillar of climate alarmism” by James Delingpole, published in The Spectator 30 April 2016

The Marine Biologist magazine features articles drawn from the scientific literature, including the JMBA.

Seeing in the dark: eye reduction and loss in deep-sea snails

Animals live in darkness all over the world. Whether they live in caves, burrows or the ocean abyss, they share many common features such as a lack of coloration and long, slender limbs and antennae. The loss of eyesight is one of the most profound and widely-reported of these. Over 150 years ago, this phenomenon was a source of frustration for Darwin, who could not understand any disadvantage to eyesight and decided the loss of eyes must be ‘attributed wholly to disuse’.

Author:
Lauren Sumner-Rooney
Category:
Evolution

Not all algae who wander are lost

Erik Sotka and Stacy Krueger-Hadfield describe an unusually successful invasion—and a novel partnership.
Author:
Erik Sotka and Stacy Krueger-Hadfield
Category:
Invasive non-native species
Genetics and molecular research
Biodiversity

Losers and winners in a high CO2 world

Juliet Brodie, Chris Williamson and Jason Hall-Spencer assess the future of northeast Atlantic seaweeds and seagrasses
Author:
Juliet Brodie, Chris Williamson and Jason Hall-Spencer
Category:
Climate change & Ocean acidification
Habitat protection and loss

A new chapter in a remarkable history

The Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) has been a leading force in biological discovery and research training since its founding in 1888. During the summer of 2013 the laboratory celebrated its 125th anniversary and began writing a new chapter in its remarkable history with the announcement of an exciting affiliation with the internationally renowned University of Chicago.

Author:
Pamela Clapp Hinkle
Category:
history
Model organism

A traditional fishery enters ‘a new era'

Native oysters Ostrea edulis are fished in the Fal estuary in Cornwall, south west England using only traditional sailing and rowing vessels. In December I accompanied Richard Clapham on board the Falmouth working boat HollyAnne to see this fishery first-hand.

Author:
Guy Baker
Category:
Fishing & aquaculture
Invasive non-native species
Marine policy

His world is oysters

Clive Askew reflects on a career in commercial bivalve aquaculture
Author:
Clive Askew
Category:
Fishing & aquaculture

Has marine conservation in Wales lost its way?

Blaise Bullimore has been involved in monitoring the Skomer Marine Nature Reserve since 1977. He charts the progress of marine nature conservation in Wales.
Author:
Blaise Bullimore
Category:
Citizen science
Habitat protection and loss
Fishing & aquaculture
Marine Protected Area

Mapping the treasures of the deep sea

Heriot-Watt University and the National Oceanography Centre join forces to map cold-water coral habitats. By Laurence De Clippele, Veerle Huvenne and Murray Roberts
Author:
Laurence De Clippele, Veerle Huvenne and Murray Roberts.
Category:
Habitat protection and loss
Biodiversity

Refugia in the ‘twilight zone’: discoveries from the Philippines

Author:
Sonia J. Rowley
Category:
Biodiversity
technology
Habitat protection and loss
Taxonomy

‘The wheel comes full circle’ Marine laboratories past, present and future

Mike Thorndyke and Fiona McGowan take a look at the role of marine labs into the future.
Author:
Mike Thorndyke and Fiona McGowan
Category:
history
Model organism
Human health & well-being

Advertising

Advertising space is available in The Marine Biologist magazine.

Everyone is fascinated by the sea

The Marine Biologist is a unique publication appealing to professionals and academics in environmental sciences, students (the marine professionals of the future), and young people. We aspire to be the quality, mass-audience magazine for the ocean.

Why advertise in The Marine Biologist?

  • A unique publication
  • Advertising placed with us reaches professionals and academics in environmental sciences, and students (the marine professionals of the future).
  • Discounts for charities, and low rates with savings on longer-term contracts.

The deadline for inclusion of advertisements in the next edition of The Marine Biologist magazine is July 31, 2017.

For prices and further information please contact membership@mba.ac.uk

The following organizations have advertised with us:

Cambridge International Examinations

PRIMER-E

Planet Ocean Ltd

CoolLED



If you have ideas or opinions about the magazine we would be delighted to hear from you.

The MBA Publications team

Tel: 01752 426239

editor@mba.ac.uk

Submissions

We welcome relevant articles, opinion pieces and reviews. See the submissions guidelines for further information.

Submissions

We welcome submissions of articles about marine life. Articles should be original and your own work. As a general guide we will ask:

  • is it new (or does it give a new slant on an existing subject)?
  • is it relevant?
  • is it accurate?
  • is it well written?

Guidelines for contributors:

We want to engage the whole marine biological community and we welcome ideas for articles. We will consider reviews of scientific literature, opinion pieces, letters, reviews of books, DVDs etc., poems, art and fiction. Articles can be much less formal in tone than a scientific paper, but should be original, concise and informative. In general we ask authors to use straightforward and clear language, and to avoid jargon.

A main article for The Marine Biologist magazine would be 1,500 to 2,000 words in length, but shorter pieces are very welcome. We are also looking for opinion pieces and reviews.

Please include representative, colourful images or graphics to support the story. You will need to own the copyright of images you submit, or have written permission from the copyright owner to use them in the context of a magazine that will be widely distributed.

Unfortunately we are unable to offer payment for articles.

If you are interested in submitting an article for consideration, please contact the Editor.

Feedback

If you have ideas or opinions about the magazine we would be delighted to hear from you.

The MBA Publications team

Tel: 01752 426239

editor@mba.ac.uk